POSTINGS

femalesoftwareeng:

When talking about inequality hurts my career in some way

See sexism? Racism?  Speak up!  And regret nothing!  

femalesoftwareeng:

When talking about inequality hurts my career in some way

See sexism? Racism?  Speak up!  And regret nothing!  

Here’s Google’s description of “Chrome Experiments,” a gallery of user-submitted Javascript: 

Chrome Experiments is a showcase for creative web experiments, the vast majority of which are built with the latest open technologies, including HTML5, Canvas, SVG, and WebGL. All of them were made and submitted by talented artists and programmers from around the world.
We hope the projects on this site provide inspiration for anyone interested in experimenting creatively with the web. And we hope they show how the web has become faster, more fun, and more open – the same spirit in which we built Google Chrome.
All of the work here is user-submitted, so naturally we’re looking for more. If you’ve made something fun and fast in JavaScript, please send it in. We can’t post everything, but we’d love to see it.

But not if you’re a mother, apparently.  
I do realize, of course, that the person who chose the “not your mother’s Javascript” tagline did not intend to be sexist.  But all the little comments add up, and they add up to a culture that gives women and girls the impression that they are not welcome.
I expect this kind of thing from callow “brogrammer” types — but this site is an official project of Google, with Google’s logo on it, created and maintained by Google employees.  

Here’s Google’s description of “Chrome Experiments,” a gallery of user-submitted Javascript: 

Chrome Experiments is a showcase for creative web experiments, the vast majority of which are built with the latest open technologies, including HTML5, Canvas, SVG, and WebGL. All of them were made and submitted by talented artists and programmers from around the world.

We hope the projects on this site provide inspiration for anyone interested in experimenting creatively with the web. And we hope they show how the web has become faster, more fun, and more open – the same spirit in which we built Google Chrome.

All of the work here is user-submitted, so naturally we’re looking for more. If you’ve made something fun and fast in JavaScript, please send it in. We can’t post everything, but we’d love to see it.

But not if you’re a mother, apparently.  

I do realize, of course, that the person who chose the “not your mother’s Javascript” tagline did not intend to be sexist.  But all the little comments add up, and they add up to a culture that gives women and girls the impression that they are not welcome.

I expect this kind of thing from callow “brogrammer” types — but this site is an official project of Google, with Google’s logo on it, created and maintained by Google employees.  

"Interviewer: So, you’re a girl, why would you be interested in a programming job?"

Uncharted Reality.: First question in the interview. 

*facepalm* 

I can’t even.  *double facepalm*

Welcome to Sexism 101, kids: point out sexism, and you’ll get plenty of defenses of it by the people that discrimination benefits. 
Note that this is a “called out” comment — so Forbes is happy to publish an article on gender inequity, but also happy to goad people into bashing it.  Perhaps they share the same brain-dead notion of “balance” that characterizes so much lazy journalism.  ”Shape of Earth: Views Differ.”
 
Note: the author themselves called out the quote.  But the person who authored the quote is a classic “derailer” straight out of Derailing for Dummies — and derailers create false debates and make it seem as if the views of the misinformed have more legitimacy than they actually do.  
ilovecharts:

I Get Comments
From my Forbes post about the publican and review of male and female writers in major literary outlets.
Would anybody like to take this? I have a horrible headache right now and I don’t even know where to begin. I can’t even…

Welcome to Sexism 101, kids: point out sexism, and you’ll get plenty of defenses of it by the people that discrimination benefits. 

Note that this is a “called out” comment — so Forbes is happy to publish an article on gender inequity, but also happy to goad people into bashing it.  Perhaps they share the same brain-dead notion of “balance” that characterizes so much lazy journalism.  ”Shape of Earth: Views Differ.”

Note: the author themselves called out the quote.  But the person who authored the quote is a classic “derailer” straight out of Derailing for Dummies — and derailers create false debates and make it seem as if the views of the misinformed have more legitimacy than they actually do.  

ilovecharts:

I Get Comments

From my Forbes post about the publican and review of male and female writers in major literary outlets.

Would anybody like to take this? I have a horrible headache right now and I don’t even know where to begin. I can’t even…

The Boys on the Bus are still, well, all boys, even thirty years later.  
thesmithian:


While The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Associated Press, and the New York Daily News have close to male-female parity…Time magazine has nine  men and only one woman, Newsweek/The Daily Beast has six men and three women, The Atlantic has seven men and two women, New York magazine has six men and one woman, and The Economist went for broke, with an all-male team of five. At The Boston Globe (seven men, three women) and Reuters (eight men, three women), the ratio is more than two to one.

on the web, things look similar:

The Huffington Post has eleven men and only two women; Politico has  twelve male reporters and six women on the campaign trail, Talking  Points Memo has five men and one woman, and Slate and The Daily both  have all-male teams.

more, plus a list of 2012 campaign reporters, here.

The Boys on the Bus are still, well, all boys, even thirty years later.  

thesmithian:

While The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Associated Press, and the New York Daily News have close to male-female parity…Time magazine has nine men and only one woman, Newsweek/The Daily Beast has six men and three women, The Atlantic has seven men and two women, New York magazine has six men and one woman, and The Economist went for broke, with an all-male team of five. At The Boston Globe (seven men, three women) and Reuters (eight men, three women), the ratio is more than two to one.

on the web, things look similar:

The Huffington Post has eleven men and only two women; Politico has twelve male reporters and six women on the campaign trail, Talking Points Memo has five men and one woman, and Slate and The Daily both have all-male teams.

more, plus a list of 2012 campaign reporters, here.

"Web Scraping For Your Mom"


"…for your mom" used as a synonym for "for dummies" is sexist.  Please stop.  

Yours truly, 

Lisa Williams, developer and mother

Women optional

I posted earlier on Zed Shaw’s response to being added to a Github repo that contains a specification for a fictitious markup language called DongML (“DongML: a flexible markup for stiff problems”).

Shaw says that the creator of the repo adds people he doesn’t like to the repo as contributors as a method of harassing them.  Github bills itself as “social coding,” and users have an activity feed; if you “follow” someone on github, you see when someone comments or adds to a repo, so everyone who “follows” Shaw might see a notice like:  ”zedshaw is now a contributor to DongML.”  

Lots of people have commented on Shaw’s response to this — in essence, once he was a contributor to the repository for DongML, he wrote a script to overwrite it again and again, prompting a brief outage of Github.com.   Some were on Shaw’s side and decried the “mob mentality” of some Ruby contributors; others characterized Shaw as a “drama queen.” 

Now I realize that I just engaged in what Jay Rosen calls “We have no idea who’s right" journalism, but in this case, I’m not obfuscating my opinion.  I really do have no idea.  

What’s notable to me is that no one seemed to object to how crass the satire was, or the fact that it included this: 

3.11 BOOB tag

The BOOB tag is optional. It is used for a better representation of the citation of the dong.

The fact that this kind of humor is considered normal and unobjectionable is an example of why many women don’t feel welcome in code culture.  Hey, according to the spec?  We’re only optional.  

About Me


Lisa Williams

Founder of Placeblogger.com | Winner of Knight News Challenge | Center for Civic Media, MIT Media Lab | Cambridge, MA | @lisawilliams on Twitter | lisawilliams on Github




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