POSTINGS

NY Times R&D - Cascade - A tool for visually tracking articles and their connections on the web

pxlpark:

Three Starting Points for Learning to Code

  1. Hackety Hack — Suitable for kids as well as adults, a program that contains a built-in programming environment with embedded lessons
  2. CodeAcademy — learn to code without anything but a browser.  
  3. The EPIC HOWTO — Coding for Journalists and Other Busy People

75+ Tools for Visualizing your Data, CSS, Flash, jQuery, PHP


vokiel:

Most people would agree that the old adage “A picture is worth a thousand words” is also true for web based solutions. There should be no discussion – Charts and Graphs are ideal to visualize data in order to quickly deliver an overview and communicate key messages.

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The pressure on journalists these days is tremendous. The industry is still reeling from the Great Media Collapse in 2008-09 where more than 30,000 journalists were axed. The industry continues to shrink with more than 2,800 lay-offs last year and more than a thousand job cuts so far this year, according to the newspaper lay-off tracker service Paper Cuts.

This means fewer journalists – with less experience – doing more work.

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George Snell, Media commentator, InTheseTimes

(via futurejournalismproject)

I’m doing a presentation to journalism educators in a couple of weeks where I’m going to take on these topics.  

Ha.  A lot of my favorite ideas — and a lot of the ones that turn out to have compelling uses — seem completely off the wall at the beginning.  
the-whole:

I should make this my superhero costume.
fab:

Great Ideas T-ShirtThe Typography Shop honors the iconic art director and designer George Lois with their newest line of shirts, The Ten Commandments of George Lois, and the first design features one of Lois’ best-known quotes: Great ideas cannot be tested. Only mediocre ideas can be tested. The man himself chose this design from several treatments, and part of the proceeds from the sale of this shirt will go to the Herschel Levit scholarship fund at Pratt Institute, his alma mater.

Ha.  A lot of my favorite ideas — and a lot of the ones that turn out to have compelling uses — seem completely off the wall at the beginning.  

the-whole:

I should make this my superhero costume.

fab:

Great Ideas T-Shirt

The Typography Shop honors the iconic art director and designer George Lois with their newest line of shirts, The Ten Commandments of George Lois, and the first design features one of Lois’ best-known quotes: Great ideas cannot be tested. Only mediocre ideas can be tested. The man himself chose this design from several treatments, and part of the proceeds from the sale of this shirt will go to the Herschel Levit scholarship fund at Pratt Institute, his alma mater.

Faith

I want to talk about what a big role faith plays in learning something new.  

Whenever I’ve committed to learning something substantial (or really, doing anything substantial) I’ve come to a point where I really didn’t know if I could do it.  

What do you do then? What do I do then?

You must plow forward blindly.  You must advance without assurances, without information.  You must keep going.  I must keep going. 

This is a profoundly *uncomfortable* place to be in.  It’s especially uncomfortable if a lot of your personal and professional identity is based on being The Smart One, because you will most assuredly feel very, very stupid.  Stupid because you haven’t learned it already, and stupid for choosing this particular thing to learn or do.  

I am not a believer (I regret this and miss the religious faith I once had, as God was a most excellent box in which to place such worries), and so I must simply bull my way through that stage.   What does really help is the encouragement of others.  So? Ask for it.  If you’re stuck, and you don’t know if you should go forward but you don’t want to give up, ask for encouragement.  You’ll get it.  People all over the place will tell you not to give up, and you can and you must treat their voice as the voice of God, redirected through the mouths of ordinary people.  

Facebook and the Back to the Future of Journalism

I’m at an event at American University, where Vadim Lavrusik is talking about Facebook’s interaction with Journalism.

After about twenty slides, I haven’t seen anything new.

Perhaps the genius of Facebook lies in its essential conservatism; the company seems obsessed with recreating every least-common-denominator web app feature — comments, upload photos, polls, streaming video — on their own platform.

It’s almost as if the company’s motto is “No Sudden Moves,” though it’s hard to believe that’s the case.

Now that Facebook is introducing “journalist pages,” I wonder what we can expect from the company if they are the ones deciding who gets such a page? Will it be the same back-to-the-future thinking we see in the site’s feature development?

About Me


Lisa Williams

Founder of Placeblogger.com | Winner of Knight News Challenge | Center for Civic Media, MIT Media Lab | Cambridge, MA | @lisawilliams on Twitter | lisawilliams on Github




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