POSTINGS

prx:

(via PRX » Piece » We’re hiring a Software Engineer)

Listen up!

What does the photo say about who should apply?

prx:

(via PRX » Piece » We’re hiring a Software Engineer)

Listen up!

What does the photo say about who should apply?

duessa:

technoskittles:

The blue screen of death everyone

Fucking amazing.

duessa:

technoskittles:

The blue screen of death everyone

Fucking amazing.

"So I ask the American commentators, please stop announcing that Landon Donovan is the “all-time U.S. leading goal scorer.” He is not. With 57 international goals, he’s not even in the Top Five.

The all-time U.S. leading goal scorer is Abby Wambach, with 167 goals, followed by Mia Hamm (158), Kristine Lilly (130), Michelle Akers (105) and Tiffeny Milbrett (100). In fact, Abby Wambach is the all-time leading goal scorer in the world, among all soccer players, male or female."

World Cup Soccer Stats Erase The Sport’s Most Dominant Players: Women (via cypher2)

Never think that data is neutral.

(Source: thewhatup)


hydrogeneportfolio:

Minimal Posters - Six Women Who Changed Science. And The World.

rachelwalexander:

Data journalism project #2: Map of Washington’s retail marijuana stores
It’s the second project in my Overly Ambitious Data Journalism Challenge: a map of all licensed retail marijuana stores in Washington, many of which began operating today.
I used TileMill to make the map and relied heavily on lifeandcode's TileMill tutorial on Data for Radicals. The map is embedded on the page via an iframe, and I mostly just copied the html and css from my initial project page for the rest of it.
Thoughts on TileMill and Mapbox
TileMill is an amazing and really powerful mapping tool that lets you import multiple shapefiles and .csv files as layers, then style them using Carto, which is similar to CSS. In the past, I’ve used Google Maps for simple tasks like this, but TileMill has a lot more flexibility for styling, and also seemed much more intuitive to me in its handling of multiple shapefiles and layers. One disadvantage seems to be that you can’t import data from a Google Spreadsheet which auto-updates - you have to download a static csv.
Even from this really quick intro, I got a lot more ideas for things that would be fun to map. I had to download a few shapefiles from the Washington Geospatial Portal and there are so many geographic datasets there that would make for fun or interesting maps.
I had some trouble figuring out how version control worked when you export a revised project to Mapbox (the company that makes TileMill and has virtual map and project hosting). That’s something I’d like to play with more and really get nailed down.
Overall, TileMill seems like a really powerful mapping tool that I’d definitely like to use more in more complicated/multilayered geospatial data projects. I’d also like a better understanding of how to use Mapbox, as well as other interactive export options from TileMill for people who are a bit more familiar with code.
Reflections/self-eval
If I’d been making this map with the newsroom in mind (instead of with the goal of learning TileMill), Google Maps probably would have been a better choice for its speed, as well as its context: state lines, major cities, etc. are clearly marked. (The Seattle Times used Google Maps for the same task yesterday.)
Figuring out the details for how a map will embed works can be tricky. It took a lot of time to get the map centering and displaying how I wanted it to, and even after that it still looked a bit wonky.
iframes in general are frustrating beasts to wrangle. While they can be quick and easy, and are certainly a necessity for people who don’t know how to code, this project underscored how much I’d like to learn to use the Mapbox API and some of the other TileMill options that give you more control on how your project is displayed.
Aside from some bumps at understanding TileMill exports, I was happy with how quickly I threw this project together. The whole thing took about 2 hours from start to finish, and without all my hiccups, I think I could have had it done in under an hour.
I also need to start doing the projects on my list that involve writing (or at least tweaking) some JavaScript, or else I’m going to run out of the quick-and-dirty ones like this.
Edit: The code for this is on Github and the map is here if anyone wants to fork it, add more stores, etc. I’d like to maintain it as more pot stores open up, but I’m guessing I’ll get buried under other stuff, so I’m extending the invitation to anyone else who’s interested.

!!!!

rachelwalexander:

Data journalism project #2: Map of Washington’s retail marijuana stores

It’s the second project in my Overly Ambitious Data Journalism Challenge: a map of all licensed retail marijuana stores in Washington, many of which began operating today.

I used TileMill to make the map and relied heavily on lifeandcode's TileMill tutorial on Data for Radicals. The map is embedded on the page via an iframe, and I mostly just copied the html and css from my initial project page for the rest of it.

Thoughts on TileMill and Mapbox

TileMill is an amazing and really powerful mapping tool that lets you import multiple shapefiles and .csv files as layers, then style them using Carto, which is similar to CSS. In the past, I’ve used Google Maps for simple tasks like this, but TileMill has a lot more flexibility for styling, and also seemed much more intuitive to me in its handling of multiple shapefiles and layers. One disadvantage seems to be that you can’t import data from a Google Spreadsheet which auto-updates - you have to download a static csv.

Even from this really quick intro, I got a lot more ideas for things that would be fun to map. I had to download a few shapefiles from the Washington Geospatial Portal and there are so many geographic datasets there that would make for fun or interesting maps.

I had some trouble figuring out how version control worked when you export a revised project to Mapbox (the company that makes TileMill and has virtual map and project hosting). That’s something I’d like to play with more and really get nailed down.

Overall, TileMill seems like a really powerful mapping tool that I’d definitely like to use more in more complicated/multilayered geospatial data projects. I’d also like a better understanding of how to use Mapbox, as well as other interactive export options from TileMill for people who are a bit more familiar with code.

Reflections/self-eval

  • If I’d been making this map with the newsroom in mind (instead of with the goal of learning TileMill), Google Maps probably would have been a better choice for its speed, as well as its context: state lines, major cities, etc. are clearly marked. (The Seattle Times used Google Maps for the same task yesterday.)
  • Figuring out the details for how a map will embed works can be tricky. It took a lot of time to get the map centering and displaying how I wanted it to, and even after that it still looked a bit wonky.
  • iframes in general are frustrating beasts to wrangle. While they can be quick and easy, and are certainly a necessity for people who don’t know how to code, this project underscored how much I’d like to learn to use the Mapbox API and some of the other TileMill options that give you more control on how your project is displayed.
  • Aside from some bumps at understanding TileMill exports, I was happy with how quickly I threw this project together. The whole thing took about 2 hours from start to finish, and without all my hiccups, I think I could have had it done in under an hour.

I also need to start doing the projects on my list that involve writing (or at least tweaking) some JavaScript, or else I’m going to run out of the quick-and-dirty ones like this.

Edit: The code for this is on Github and the map is here if anyone wants to fork it, add more stores, etc. I’d like to maintain it as more pot stores open up, but I’m guessing I’ll get buried under other stuff, so I’m extending the invitation to anyone else who’s interested.

!!!!

"The most dangerous phrase in the language is, ‘We’ve always done it this way.’"

Grace Hopper (via goto-blog)
"

I did things in my 30s that were ignored by the world, that could have been quickly labeled a failure. Here’s a classic example; in 1974 I did a movie called Phantom of the Paradise. Phantom of the Paradise, which was a huge flop in this country. There were only two cities in the world where it had any real success: Winnipeg, in Canada, and Paris, France. So, okay, let’s write it off as a failure. Maybe you could do that.

But all of the sudden, I’m in Mexico, and a 16-year-old boy comes up to me at a concert with an album - a Phantom of the Paradise soundtrack- and asks me to sign it. I sign it. Evidently I was nice to him and we had a nice little conversation. I don’t remember the moment, I remember signing the album (I don’t know if I think I remember or if I actually remember). But this little 14 or 16, whatever old this guy was… Well I know who the guy is now because I’m writing a musical based on Pan’s Labyrinth; it’s Guillermo del Toro.

The work that I’ve done with Daft Punk it’s totally related to them seeing Phantom of the Paradise 20 times and deciding they’re going to reach out to this 70-year-old songwriter to get involved in an album called Random Access Memories.

So, what is the lesson in that? The lesson for me is being very careful about what you label a failure in your life. Be careful about throwing something in the round file as garbage because you may find that it’s the headwaters of a relationship that you can’t even imagine it’s coming in your future.

"

Paul Williams  (via albinwonderland)

What perfect advice for artists.

(via hollyblack)

Paul Williams’ “failure,” Phantom of Paradise, is Guillermo del Toro’s secret origin-story

(via mostlysignssomeportents)

raegraced:

breathingsboring:

kateviardo:

dduane:

Book titles rewritten to get more clicks, Upworthy style

Little women’s one made me choke on my tea

This one from the link though:

image

Perfection.

Jane Eyre and Little Women are the best ones!

tastefullyoffensive:

Previously: Cat/Bird Graph [x]

tastefullyoffensive:

Previously: Cat/Bird Graph [x]

"I only wear ties to weddings, funerals, and when I’m getting thrown out of city hall."

County reporter (via rachelwalexander)

Here’s What Female And Male Journalists Actually Make


journolist:

At entry level, men and women seem to be paid equally.

Which makes sense, given the lack of room for negotiation. Both men and women working in New York City reported median salaries of $40,000 at the entry level. (Since cost of living varies so widely, we isolated respondents from New…

Where Bars Outnumber Grocery Stores [map]


mediamattersforamerica:

In the world of our nation’s top newspapers, female editors are sparse.
Fact: None of the ten largest newspapers in the U.S. are led by women.

mediamattersforamerica:

In the world of our nation’s top newspapers, female editors are sparse.

Fact: None of the ten largest newspapers in the U.S. are led by women.

theatlantic:

Our June issue is now online! 
Ta-Nehisi Coates makes the case for reparations, Brian Mockenhaupt investigates the deadliest wildfire in 80 years, Dahlia Lithwick considers Antonin Scalia, and much more.

This is really quite remarkable.

theatlantic:

Our June issue is now online! 

Ta-Nehisi Coates makes the case for reparations, Brian Mockenhaupt investigates the deadliest wildfire in 80 years, Dahlia Lithwick considers Antonin Scalia, and much more.

This is really quite remarkable.

About Me


Lisa Williams

Founder of Placeblogger.com | Winner of Knight News Challenge | Center for Civic Media, MIT Media Lab | Cambridge, MA | @lisawilliams on Twitter | lisawilliams on Github




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